Durham VA Pharmacy Residency Programs | Veterans Affairs (2023)

Durham VA Health Care System welcomes you to the Pharmacy Residency Program Website

Preceptors: Bottom (L to R) Radhika Kothapalli, Janine Bailey, Alicia Watkins, Susan Bullard, Rachel Britt, Sara Britnell, Alicia Hairston; Middle (L to R) Dan Katzenberger, Jill Bates, Melissa Durkee, Amy Randolph, Andreina Ottman, Jayme Spivey, Tracie Rothrock-Christian, Bill Bryan; Top (L to R) Megan Gilbertson, Caleb Burns, Ryan Owenby, Debra Kemp, Marc Pepin, Mohamed Hashem, Brandon DeLuccca, Jon Hale, Mary Parker, Jamie Brown

Durham VA Pharmacy Clinical Team

Janine Bailey, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) Program at the Durham VA Medical Center. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University at Buffalo in 2007. She then completed a PGY1 residency at the North Texas VAMC and a PGY2 geriatric residency at the Durham VAMC. After her geriatric residency, she practiced as an Internal Medicine Clinical Pharmacy Specialist on an Acute Care of the Elderly (ACE) unit at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, DE. She then returned to the Durham VAMC practicing in the Community Living Center (CLC) for nine years prior to transitioning to HBPC. Practice interests include geriatrics and deprescribing.

Jill S. Bates, PharmD, MS, BCOP, FASHP is the national PHASER Pharmacy Program Manager for the Department of Veterans Affairs specializing in precision medicine. She is also Associate Professor of Clinical Education at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Dr. Bates completed her Bachelor of Science at Eastern Illinois University, a Master of Science with concentration in biochemistry and biophysics at Northern Illinois University and her Doctor of Pharmacy at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She completed a post graduate year 1 (PGY1) pharmacy practice and PGY2 oncology pharmacy residency at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Bates practiced at UNC Medical Center for 11 years serving the hematologic malignancy population in both the acute and ambulatory care environment prior to shifting focus on precision medicine. She has experience as a leader in clinical pharmacy practice, oncology pharmacy, and residency training. Dr. Bates has a passion for advancing pharmacy practice through education rooted in the belief that learning improves lives.

Sara R. Britnell, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Formulary Management for the Durham VA Health Care System. She received her PharmD from the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy. She then completed her PGY1 residency at the Durham VA Medical Center in Durham, NC. Dr. Britnell continued her post-graduate training as a PGY2 resident specializing in drug information at the Durham VA Medical Center in Durham, NC. In addition to formulary management, her interests include drug information, pain, and women’s health.

Rachel B. Britt, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Formulary Management at the Durham VA Health Care System. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. She then completed her PGY1 Pharmacy Residency at FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital, followed by a PGY2 Drug Information Residency at the Durham VA Health Care System. She subsequently accepted a position there as the Hepatology Clinical Pharmacy Specialist and has recently transitioned to Formulary Management. In addition to hepatology and formulary management, her practice interests include infectious diseases, gastroenterology, and drug information.

Jamie N. Brown, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS, BCACP is the PGY2 Medication-Use Safety and Policy Residency Program Director. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and then completed an ASHP-accredited specialty residency in Drug Information with Campbell University. After completion of his residency, Dr. Brown accepted a clinical position with the Durham VA Medical Center as the Manager of the Drug Information Center and Investigational Drug Service. In addition, Dr. Brown is a Clinical Professor of Pharmacy Practice with Campbell University and precepts fourth-year PharmD candidates and PGY1 and PGY2 Residents in the Drug Information rotation. In 2014, Dr. Brown was the recipient of the NCAP Distinguished Young Pharmacist Award and received the Hospital Practice Preceptor of the Year Award from the Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences class of 2014.Dr. Brown is very active in ASHP, ACCP, and NCAP and is currently the Chair-Elect of ACCP’s Drug Information Practice and Research Network. Additionally, Dr. Brown was elected as a Fellow of ACCP in 2020.

William (Bill) Bryan III, PharmD, BCPS is a clinical pharmacy specialist in the Community Living Center/Geriatrics. He earned a Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He then completed a pharmacy practice PGY1 and a health-system administration PGY2 residency at the Gainesville, Florida VAMC. After residency, Dr. Bryan practiced in acute and long-term care. Dr. Bryan came to work at the Durham VAMC in formulary management for approximately 10 years prior to transition to Geriatrics and is active in resident learning for both PGY1 & PGY2 programs. Dr. Bryan is also a resource for clinical data mining and analysis. Dr. Bryan’s professional interests include aging, bone health, post-operative care, regulatory affairs, pharmacoeconomics, pharmacoepidemiology, antimicrobial stewardship, medication safety, and mental health.

Susan Bullard, PharmD is the CPS supervisor for PACT/Anticoag/Pain. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Florida in 1992 and completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the VA Medical Center in Memphis, Tennessee the following year. After completion of her residency, Dr. Bullard accepted a clinical pharmacy specialist position at the Durham VA Medical Center. She established the Pharmacy Practice Residency Program in 1994 and was the first residency director along with establishing the PRIME Pharmacy disease state management clinic. Dr. Bullard currently works in the anticoagulation clinic and provides coverage for PACT medication management clinics. Her areas of interests are HTN, anticoagulation and medication management.

Jonas “Caleb” Burns, PharmD is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in PACT/HEDIS at the Durham VA Medical Center. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy from Wingate University School of Pharmacy andcompleted a PGY1 Residency at the Charles George VA Medical Center in Asheville, NC. Caleb joined Durham in the summer of 2017 working in the primary care setting where he provides medication management and population health services.

Brian Chatel, PharmD, BCNSP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Critical Care and Nutrition Support. He received his PharmD from University of Southern Nevada, Nevada College of Pharmacy, and completed a PGY1 residency at Charleston Area Medical Center with emphasis in Critical Care and Clinical Nutrition in Charleston, West Virginia. Dr. Chatel has developed a Clinical Nutrition Program at the community hospital level and assessed and updated nutrition practice at Saint Vincent Hospital in Erie, PA. Dr. Chatel currently is the pharmacist on the Nutrition Support Team and performs daily rounds in Critical Care at Durham VAMC.

Hannah Cook, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Ambulatory Care. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She went on to complete her PGY1 Pharmacy Practice residency and PGY2 Ambulatory Care Pharmacy residency at the Durham VA Health Care System. Following completion of residency, she accepted a position as a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Primary Care at the Clayton Community Based Outpatient Clinic where she sees patients for a variety of disease states such as hypertension, diabetes, anticoagulation, hyperlipidemia, smoking cessation, COPD, hypothyroidism, and medication adherence.

(Video) Refill Your VA Prescriptions With My HealtheVet

Brandon DeLucca, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Internal Medicine. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy in 2017. From there, he completed his PGY1 pharmacy residency at the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital (JAHVH) in Tampa, FL. After residency, Brandon worked as an outpatient staff and anticoagulation pharmacist at JAHVH before joining the Durham VA in March 2019. His professional interests include infectious diseases, pain management, and geriatrics.

Melissa Durkee, PharmD, BCACP is the Associate Chief of Pharmacy for Clinical Services at the Durham VA Medical Center (Durham VAMC) and a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Women’s Health. She received her Bachelor of Science Degree from the Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University and her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Campbell University. Dr. Durkee has experience in community pharmacy and completed an academia/geriatrics specialty residency prior to joining the Durham VAMC team in 2001. She is a graduate of the VA Executive Career Field class of 2008. She maintains a clinical practice in the women’s health primary care clinic and is actively involved with several local, regional and national VA committees and for the NC Association of Pharmacists. Areas of interest for Dr. Durkee include geriatrics, primary care, women’s health and practice management.

Megan E. Gilbertson, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in 1D Primary Care andPopulation Health Management at the Durham VA Health Care System. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from Wayne State University in Detroit, MI in 2015. After she completed her PGY1 Pharmacy Residency at VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System in Ann Arbor, MI, she stayed to begin her career at VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System focusing on providing services for dialysis, mental health and emergency department. She now works in primary care in Durham providing medication management services and population health management.

Alicia Hairston, PharmD, BCOP is a clinical pharmacy specialist in oncology at the Durham VAMC. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, completed a pharmacy practice residency at Central Arkansas VAMC, and a specialty residency in oncology at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, TN. Prior to starting at the Durham VAMC, she worked as an inpatient clinical pharmacist in hematology/oncology at Duke University Hospital. Her areas of interest include hematology, oncology, supportive care, and pain management.

Jonathan (Jon) Hale, PharmD, BCPS is a Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) and Transitional Care (TLC) Clinical Pharmacy Specialist. Jon is an Army veteran and served for 9 years as a Field Artillery Officer prior to attending pharmacy school. He completed his Doctor of Pharmacy degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While a student at UNC, Jon was a VALOR pharmacy intern at the Durham VA Healthcare System, assigned to work with the formulary management team. Prior to coming to Durham, Jon completed a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency at the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System in Nashville and Murfreesboro, TN.

Julia Hammond, PharmD, BCOP is the PGY2 Oncology Residency Program Director. She completed her BS and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees at the University of South Carolina and her Pharmacy Practice & Oncology Specialty Residencies at the West Virginia University Hospital in Morgantown WV. Prior to joining the Durham VAMC, Dr. Hammond practiced as an Oncology Clinical Specialist at Fletcher Allen Healthcare in Burlington VT and as the Oncology Clinical Manager at Duke University Hospital where she also served as PGY2 Oncology Residency Director. Her areas of interest include hematology & oncology therapeutics, supportive care and pain management.

Mohamed G. Hashem, PharmD, BCPS is a Pharmacoeconomics Program Manager. He earned a Doctor of Pharmacy from the South Carolina College of Pharmacy (University of South Carolina at Columbia campus) in 2010. He then completed a managed care pharmacy practice PGY1 residency at Medco Health Solutions Inc. in Franklin Lakes, NJ. After residency, Dr. Hashem accepted a position at Medco Health Solutions as a Clinical Content and Coverage Appeals Manager. In April 2013, Dr. Hashem joined the Durham VAMC in formulary management and is active in resident learning for both PGY1 & PGY2 programs. Areas of interest for Dr. Hashem include pharmacoeconomics, hepatitis c, medication adherence, research, and pharmacogenomics.

Sarai Ibrahim, PharmD, MS, BCACP is a Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Hillandale Road Outpatient Clinic. She obtained a BA in Communication Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Doctor of Pharmacyand Masters in Clinical Research from Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. She then completed a pharmacy practice residency at the W.G. Hefner VAMC in Salisbury, North Carolina. Dr. Ibrahim is a part of the Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) within the clinic and her practice interests include diabetes, hypertension, and population management.

Christie Kahlon, PharmD, MBA, BCPP, BCGP is the Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Mental Health at the Durham VA Health Care System. She earned her Doctor of Pharmacy from Wingate University in 2015. She then completed a general pharmacy practice PGY1 residency at the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System and a specialty residency in psychiatry at a combined residency with the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System and the University of Iowa. After residency, Dr. Kahlon accepted a position at the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System working both inpatient and outpatient mental health. She also was an adjunct professor for the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy and preceptor to both residents and pharmacy students. She was active in education for medical students and psychiatry residents at the University of Iowa as well. Dr. Kahlon joined the Durham VA in 2018 working in inpatient mental health. Areas of interest include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, PTSD, and geriatrics.

Dan Katzenberger, PharmD, BCPS, BCCP is the Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Cardiology in the Durham VA Health Care System and precepts the Cardiology/CICU elective rotation. He earned a B.S. in Biology from Viterbo University in La Crosse, WI and received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. During pharmacy school he was a pharmacy VALOR intern at the Madison VA Medical Center, which led him to want to pursue additional training and a career in the VA system. He completed a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency at the Milwaukee VA Medical Center and then continued his training by completing a PGY2 Cardiology pharmacy residency at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center. Following residency, Dan moved out of the Midwest for the first time and joined the Durham VA pharmacy team in 2017. In June 2021, Dan was the recipient of the Duke Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Outstanding Service Award for contributions made towards resident development. When he’s not at work you can probably find him on a hiking trail or somewhere else outdoors.

Debra W. Kemp, PharmD, BCPS, BCACPisthe PGY1 Residency Program Director. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed a primary care specialty residency at UNC Hospitals in Chapel Hill, NC. Prior to this position, Dr. Kemp worked at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center as an outpatient clinical pharmacist within the cardiology division, and was then on faculty at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in a co-funded position with the VA. In 2014, Dr. Kemp transitioned her efforts to a full-time clinical pharmacist specialist position at the VA focused in the 1D/1F primary care clinic. In addition, Dr. Kemp serves as the Chair of the Residency Advisory Committee and is a member of the Pharmacy Residency Research Advisory Committee. Dr. Kemp was awarded the NCAP Distinguished Young Pharmacist Award in 2011, the 2013 Experiential Faculty Instructor of the Year for UNC, and NCAP Ambulatory Care Pharmacist of the Year in 2020. Her interest areas include management of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension and PTSD.

Radhika Kothapalli, PharmD, BCACP is a Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) Clinical Pharmacist and HBPC/Specialty Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Supervisor. She earned a B.S. in Pharmacy in 1992 and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree in 1995, both at the University of North Carolina. She completed a Pharmacy Practice residency at Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital (1993) and an Ambulatory Care specialty residency at the Iowa City VAMC (1997). Prior to coming to the Durham VAMC, she worked for 4 years as an Ambulatory Care Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Iowa City VAMC.

Jenny Legge, PharmD is a Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Hillandale Road Outpatient Clinic. She graduated and received her Doctor of Pharmacy in 2004 from Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio. She completed a pharmacy practice residency and primary care specialty residency at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Huntington, West Virginia. After completing her primary care residency, she accepted a position with the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center at the Hillandale Road Outpatient Clinic. Dr. Legge currently operates a Medication Management Clinic, which focuses on, but not limited to, drug therapy in the areas of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, smoking cessation, medication compliance and anticoagulation. She also helped to establish shared medical appointments (group classes) for patients with diabetes and hypertension.

(Video) VHA Frontline Clinical Nurses

Ashley McKnight, PharmD, BCPS, BCGPis the Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Pulmonary at the Durham VA Health Care System. She earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree and three-year graduate Rural Health Certificate from the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 2018. She completed her PGY1 residency at the Durham VA where she developed an interest in internal medicine and geriatrics. She stayed at the Durham VA to complete the PGY2 Geriatric pharmacy residency. Dr. McKnight began developing pulmonary clinical pharmacy services in July 2020. Her pulmonary areas of interest include airway disease, transitions of care, and medication safety in interstitial lung disease.

Clayton B. Nance II, PharmD, BCPS, BCIDP, CACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Surgery and Antimicrobial Stewardship. He received his PharmD from Campbell University before accepting a staff pharmacist position at Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, NC. He then spent the past 4 years practicing as a clinical pharmacist covering surgical services, internal medicine, and antimicrobial stewardship at UNC Rex Hospital in Raleigh, NC while also completing certificate programs in antimicrobial stewardship, anticoagulation, and lipid management. Dr. Nance joined the Durham VA Medical Center in March 2020 and currently rounds with the general and vascular surgery teams as well as co-managing the OPAT service and assisting with inpatient antimicrobial stewardship. In addition to surgical services, his interests include antimicrobial pharmacotherapy, management of drug-resistant infections, and anticoagulation.

Andreina A. Ottman, PharmD, BCGP, is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Ambulatory Care. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Palm Beach Atlantic University in sunny West Palm Beach, Florida. She completed her PGY1 pharmacy residency and PGY2 Geriatrics residency at the Durham VAHCS and subsequently joined the ambulatory care service, practicing in the women’s health clinic. In addition to ambulatory care, her practice interests include geriatrics, internal medicine, and infectious disease.

Ryan K. Owenby, PharmD is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Emergency Medicine. He earned a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in Chapel Hill, NC. He then completed a PGY1 residency at the Durham VA Medical Center. After residency, Dr. Owenby accepted a Clinical Staff Pharmacist position at WakeMed Health and Hospitals in Raleigh, NC. His primary area of practice was in the level 1 trauma emergency department, as well as the medical, surgical, and neurological ICU. In 2013, Dr. Owenby returned to the Durham VA to establish clinical pharmacy services within the emergency department. At the VA, Dr. Owenby continues to precept UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy students and PGY1 residents during their emergency medicine elective rotation. Dr. Owenby has served as the co-chair for the national Emergency Department Subject Matter Expert committee through the Clinical Pharmacy Practice Office. His areas of interest include infectious disease, acute stroke management, toxicology, and improving medication safety in the emergency department.

Mary Parker, PharmD, FASHP, FCCP, BCPS, BCCP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Ambulatory Care and Clinic Coordinator for the 1D Primary Care Clinic. She completed her Doctor of Pharmacy degree at Campbell University School of Pharmacy, pharmacy practice residency at The Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, and specialty practice residency in Anticoagulation/Cardiology/Academia at Moses Cone Health System and Campbell University. She developed pharmacist-led clinics as Director, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Services in a multi-specialty physician office practice affiliated with Moses Cone in Greensboro, NC from 2000 – 2011 prior to joining the Durham VA. She was recognized as Preceptor of the Year by UNC School of Pharmacy in 2005 and the Upsher-Smith Innovation in Pharmacy Award winner for NC in 2011. Dr. Parker precepts and mentors residents and Doctor of Pharmacy Candidates from UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Campbell University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. She is active in national and state organizations: she is a past-president of the NC Association of Pharmacists (2013), has served ASHP and ACCP in a variety of roles, and has been designated as Fellow of ACCP in 2014 and Fellow of ASHP in 2015. She will begin service as Regent for the ACCP Board of Regents in Fall 2020. Dr. Parker’s research interests include process improvement for care delivery, arrhythmias, and heart failure.

Emily Patterson, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Endocrinology at the Durham VA Health Care System. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy. While a student at UNC, she was a VALOR pharmacy intern at the Durham VAMC from 2012-2013, working with the formulary management team. Dr. Patterson completed a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency at the Richard L. Roudebush VAMC in Indianapolis, IN and a PGY2 ambulatory care residency at Duke University Hospital in Durham, NC. After completion of her residencies, she joined the Durham VAMC at the Raleigh CBOC working in primary care and anticoagulation. In May 2020, she transitioned to her current role where she created clinical pharmacy specialist services in the endocrinology department. She works mainly with complex diabetes patients (many who are on continuous glucose monitors and/or on U500 insulin) and in the bone clinic.

Marc J. Pepin, PharmD, BCPS, BCGP is the PGY2 Geriatric Residency Program Director. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Florida and completed a geriatric pharmacy practice residency at the North Florida/South Georgia VAMC. After residency, Dr. Pepin accepted a position in acute care medicine at the James A. Haley VAMC, where he then transitioned to acute care surgery. He served as a preceptor for fourth-year PharmD candidates and PGY1 residents on medicine/surgery rotations. In January 2014, Dr. Pepin accepted a position at the Durham VAMC as a Geriatric Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in the Community Living Center (CLC). He is a preceptor for PGY1 and PGY2 residents, and interests include geriatrics, deprescribing, surgery, and medication safety.

Amy Randolph, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Durham VAMC. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from Northeastern University in Boston MA. She then completed a pharmacy residency at the Durham VAMC in Durham, North Carolina. Dr. Randolph joined the Durham VA pharmacy team after residency and currently works primarily in the outpatient anticoagulation clinic managing patients on warfarin, low-molecular weight heparin, and the direct oral anticoagulants. In addition to anticoagulation, her practice interests include hypertension and diabetes.

Tracie Rothrock-Christian, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Internal Medicine at the Durham VAMC. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and then completed a pharmacy practice residency at Duke University Hospital. Immediately following her residency, she worked as the Emergency Department Clinical Pharmacist at Duke Hospital. Prior to her current position, she was employed as a Clinical Pharmacist in Internal Medicine at Duke University Hospital and a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She also served as an Assistant Director of Pharmacy Education with the Duke Area Health Education Center. Dr. Rothrock-Christian serves as a preceptor for UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy students. She precepts PGY1 and PGY2 residents in Internal Medicine and serves as the Inpatient Coordinator for the PGY1 residency program.

Randy Seys, PharmD, MS, BCGP, GCPP, CPE is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Pain Management at the Durham VA Health Care System as well as an Adjunct Assistant Professor for the Division of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education at the University of North Carolina College of Pharmacy. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Illinois College of Pharmacy in Chicago, Illinois. He served in both the Air Force and Air National Guard and then continued in the uniformed services until retiring from the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps in 2018. During his time with the US PHS, he served in both the Indian Health Service and the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). While attached to the BOP, he developed the agency’s first PGY1 residency program and pharmacy-based pain management clinic. He is board certified in geriatrics and is a certified pain educator (ASPE) as well as a general credential pain practitioner (AIPM).

Kristin Smith, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Ambulatory Care. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She completed her PGY1 Pharmacy Practice residency and PGY2 Geriatrics residency at the Durham VA Health Care System. She is now practicing in ambulatory care at the 1D Primary Care Clinic at the Durham VA where sees patients for a variety of disease states such as hypertension, diabetes, anticoagulation, hyperlipidemia, smoking cessation, COPD, hypothyroidism, and medication adherence. Her main area of interests include geriatrics, cardiology, and diabetes.

Jayme Spivey, PharmD, MS, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Durham VA Medical Center. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree and Master of Science in Clinical Research degree in 2012 from Campbell University in Buies Creek, NC. She completed a PGY1 pharmacy residency in 2013 at the Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System in the Joint Ambulatory Care Clinic located in Pensacola, FL. She worked several years at the James H. Quillen VA Medical Center in Mountain Home, TN in the anticoagulation clinic and primary care settings prior to joining the anticoagulation clinic service at the Durham VA Medical Center.

Frank Tillman III, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Academic Detailing and Mental Health/Substance Use Disorders. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 2019 and then completed a PGY1 Acute Care pharmacy residency followed by a PGY2 in Psychiatry at UNC Medical Center. His professional areas of interest include severe and persistent mental health, substance use disorders, health and workplace equity, and professional wellbeing. As a previous VALOR Intern in 2017, Dr. Tillman is extremely excited to be able to impact veteran health outcomes.

(Video) BTS | EP34 - Becoming the Access Point With Rob Maher

Mary L. Townsend, PharmD, AAHIVP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Infectious Diseases and Inpatient/Specialty Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Supervisor at the Durham VA Health Care System and an Adjunct Associate Professor in Infectious Diseases (Department of Medicine) as Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Mercer University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Atlanta, Georgia. She then completed a pharmacy practice residency at Duke University Hospital and a specialty residency in Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases/Academia with Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Duke University Hospital in Durham, NC. Prior to coming to the Durham VAHCS, she worked for two years as a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy and was the Assistant Director of the Duke Area Health Education Center at Duke University Hospital. Dr. Townsend has been at the Durham VAHCS since 2003 and previously was an Associate Professor at Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences for twelve years and the Co-Director of the Duke/Campbell Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases/Academia Residency Program prior to her current clinical position. She was recognized as Professor of the Year at Campbell University School of Pharmacy in 2013. Dr. Townsend precepts residents on infectious diseases rotation, is the Co-Director of the Antibiotic Stewardship Program at the Durham VAHCS, Co-chair of the National Antimicrobial Stewardship CPPO Subject Matter Expert Work Group and was previously Chair of the Stewardship Committee of the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists. Her areas of interest include HIV, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of antimicrobial agents, and Antibiotic Stewardship.

Adam Vanderman, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Durham VA Medical Center. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in Chapel Hill, NC in 2012. He completed his PGY1 pharmacy residency and PGY2 geriatrics residency at the Durham VA Medical Center and subsequently joined the anticoagulation service, practicing in the outpatient setting. In addition to anticoagulation, his practice interests include geriatrics and respiratory medicine.

Alicia Watkins, PharmD, BCGP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in ambulatory care. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Utah College of Pharmacy in Salt Lake City, UT. She then completed her PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency at UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Community Care of North Carolina followed by a PGY2 residency in geriatrics at the Durham VA Health Care System. Following the completion of her PGY2 residency, she accepted a position as clinical pharmacy specialist in the PRIME primary care clinic at the Durham VA where she sees patients for a variety of disease states including, but not limited to, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking cessation, hypothyroidism, and medication adherence. Her areas of interest include geriatrics and diabetes.

Catherine Woodard, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Durham VA Medical Center. She received her BS in Pharmacy from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC and her Doctor of Pharmacy from Campbell University in Buies Creek, NC. She completed a primary care residency at Mission Hospitals in Asheville, NC. Prior to starting at the Durham VA Medical center, she worked at Kaiser Permanente in Atlanta, GA as a clinical pharmacy specialist in primary care and as an assistant professor for Campbell University. Dr. Woodard has established a drug information service at the Durham VA, as well as a pharmacy run hyperlipidemia service and a pharmacy run hepatitis C clinic. Currently, Dr. Woodard serves as the anticoagulation program director for the Durham VA Medical Center.

Raleigh CBOC Preceptors: (L to R) Emily Peedin, Carrie Thomas, Lindsay Garris, Brianna Glynn-Servedio, Alev Gulum, Jennie Hewitt, and Carolyn Steber

Lindsay Garris, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP is the PGY2 Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Residency Program Director. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy at Long Island University—Brooklyn Campus. She then completed her Pharmacy Practice and PGY2 Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Residencies at the VA Maryland Health Care System (VAMHCS). Upon completion of her residency training, she was hired as a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at VAMHCS where she established clinical pharmacy services in the Early Renal Insufficiency Clinic and provided direct patient care in the Heart Failure, Pharmacotherapy, Anticoagulation, and Erythropoietin Clinics. Since joining the Raleigh III Community-Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC) team, she has expanded existing clinical pharmacy services in medication management and anticoagulation monitoring and partnered with Primary Care-Mental Health Integration to provide shared medical appointments for chronic pain management. She is a preceptor for the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She is involved with VA pharmacy residency training both locally and nationally as the VA Pharmacy Residency Coordinator, Federal Residents Council advisor, and VA Pharmacy Residency Advisory Board member.

Brianna Glynn-Servedio, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Raleigh 1 Community Based Outpatient Clinic. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She completed a PGY1 and PGY2 residency in Ambulatory Care at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital (Madison VA) in Madison, WI. She now works in primary care in Raleigh providing medication management and anticoagulation services. Her main interests include diabetes, resistant hypertension, COPD, and geriatrics. Dr. Glynn-Servedio is also a member of the Pharmacy Research Advisory Committee.

Alev Gulum, PharmD, BCPSis a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Raleigh Community-Based Outpatient Clinic (RCBOC). She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Rhode Island (URI) College of Pharmacy. While studying at URI, she worked as a VALOR intern for the VISN 3 PBM and focused predominantly on formulary management. Dr. Gulum went on to complete her PGY-1 Residency and PGY-2 Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Residency at the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System in Nashville and Murfreesboro, TN. She now works in primary care providing medication management and anticoagulation services in Raleigh. Her other areas of interest include geriatrics, chronic pain management, research, and formulary management.

Jennie Hewitt, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Raleigh 3 Community- Based Outpatient Clinic (RCBOC). She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. She then completed a pharmacy practice residency at the W.G. Hefner VAMC in Salisbury, North Carolina. Dr. Hewitt oversees the anticoagulation clinic at the RCBOCs including INR monitoring, lab monitoring of direct-acting oral anticoagulants, low molecular weight heparin monitoring, anticoagulation related consults as well as quality assurance for the Raleigh anticoagulation clinic. She is also involved in Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) where she is involved in the management of diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension in medication management clinics.

Paige Morizio, PharmD, BCPS is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) Program at the Clayton-East Raleigh Clinic. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2019. She then completed a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency and a PGY2 geriatric pharmacy residency at the Durham VAHCS. After completion of her geriatric residency, she began her role in HBPC at the Durham VAHCS. Her practice interests include geriatrics, polypharmacy, and deprescribing.

Carolyn Steber, PharmD, CDCES is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist (CPS) at the Raleigh 1 Community Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC). She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from Wingate University School of Pharmacy. Dr. Steber completed a pharmacy practice residency at the WG (Bill) Hefner VA in Salisbury, NC. She then completed a second year of residency at Wingate University School of Pharmacy where she specialized in ambulatory care. After residency, she started her career as a CPS with the Durham VAHCS at the Greenville Healthcare Center. In 2015, she transferred to the Raleigh 1 CBOC where she continues to serve as the CPS for several Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) providing medication management and anticoagulation services. Dr. Steber also leads the diabetes and hypertension shared medical appointments (SMAs) at the Raleigh 1 clinic.

(Video) Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Adults Discharged from the ER (EQUIPPED)

Carrie Thomas, PharmD, BCACP is the Clinical Pharmacy Supervisor for the Raleigh and Clayton Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs). She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 1999. She then completed a PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Virginia Health System and a PGY2 Primary Care Specialty Residency at VCU Health System-Medical College of Virginia Hospitals & Physicians in Richmond, VA. Prior to coming to the Durham VAMC in 2007, she worked for six years at Grady Health System and served as program director for the Primary Care Specialty Residency and was a Clinical Pharmacist Specialist in Primary Care. Dr. Thomas established CPS-run disease management clinics at the Raleigh CBOC and has aided in the expansion of clinical services from 1 to 8 CPS spread across 3 sites of care. Her areas of interest include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and research on ambulatory care CPS

Greenville Health Care Center Preceptors:Left to right: Emily Heritage, Jillaine (Jill) Hardee, Emily Koenig, Sara Carlisle, Heather Coleman

Sara Carlisle, PharmD is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Greenville VA HCC in anticoagulation. Sara received her Doctor of Pharmacy in 2016 from Campbell University. She then completed a PGY1 with an ambulatory care focus at the Fayetteville VAMC. After residency, Sara took a position in PACT/Anticoagulation at the Greenville VA in July of 2017. In 2019, Sara transitioned to her current role as the Anticoagulation Lead at the Greenville HCC.

Heather Coleman, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Greenville VA Health Care Center. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 2015. While a student at UNC, Heather was a VALOR pharmacy intern at the Durham VAMC from 2012-2014, working primarily with geriatric practitioners in the CLC and COACH programs. After graduation, she completed a PGY1 Ambulatory Care Residency at UNC Medical Center and Ambulatory Care Clinics. After residency, she accepted a position as a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Greenville VA HCC working in the PACT and Anticoagulation clinics. As of August 2019, she transitioned to the Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) program in Greenville. Her main interests include geriatrics and chronic disease management in the primary care setting.

Natasha L. Edmondson, BS, PharmD, BCGP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in PACT/Anticoagulation at the Greenville Healthcare Center in Greenville, North Carolina. She arrived at the Durham VA System in March 2020 after transferring from the Dallas Veteran Affairs Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Edmondson started her professional career with the Teaching Fellows program, of which the “best and brightest” were selected in the pivotal role of teaching. She served as a Teaching Fellow at NC Central University in Durham NC, where she graduated summa cum laude, receiving a BS degree in Chemistry/Secondary Education with a minor in Spanish. Dr. Edmondson taught middle/high school for several years in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School system prior to starting pharmacy school at Howard University in Washington DC. Graduating in 2007, Dr. Edmondson was awarded the DC Pharmacy Recognition award, bestowed upon the student demonstrating a strong commitment for pharmaceutical service to the DC community. Upon completion of her PharmD, Dr. Edmondson completed an ASHP accredited PGY1 at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond Virginia. There she focused on community care to indigent populations, as well as traditional ambulatory pharmacy. Dr. Edmondson is a Board Certified Geriatric Pharmacist (BCGP) with interests that include geriatric pharmacy, patient safety, and pharmacy policy.

Brooke Espenschied, PharmD is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the GreenvilleVA Health Care Center. Brooke received her Doctor of Pharmacy from Ohio Northern University. Upon graduation, she completed her PGY1 residency specializing in ambulatory care at the VA Central Ohio Healthcare System in Columbus. After completing her residency, Brooke joined the Greenville VA where she currently works as a PACT Clinical Pharmacy Specialist.

Emily Heritage, PharmD, BCACP is the Clinical Pharmacy Supervisor at the Greenville VA Health Care Center (GHCC). She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She then completed a pharmacy practice residency at the Durham VAMC. Dr. Heritage has established disease management, anticoagulation clinics and a diabetes shared medical appointment at the GHCC. Her main areas of focus are hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. She also serves as a preceptor for the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Emily Koenig, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Greenville VA HCC in PACT and anticoagulation. Emily received her Doctor of Pharmacy in 2010 from the University of Kentucky, College of Pharmacy. She then completed a PGY1 with a focus in ambulatory care and anticoagulation at the Boston VAMC in 2011. After completing her residency in Boston, she began working as a PACT Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Binghamton, NY CBOC (part of the Syracuse VAMC). In 2012 she became a board certified ambulatory care pharmacist. In March of 2015 she took her current position at the Greenville VA HCC.

Morehead City CBOC Preceptors:Left to right: Elizabeth (Beth) Flippin, Leslie Kriger

(Video) VA Nurses Making a Difference - High Reliability Organization in Action (Commit to Zero Harm)

Leslie Kriger, PharmD, BCACP is a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the Morehead City VA Outpatient Clinic. She received her Doctor of Pharmacy from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She completed her PGY1 residency at the Durham VA Medical Center. Dr. Kriger is board certified in ambulatory care pharmacy (BCACP) and has been with the Durham VA HCS pharmacy team since her residency and practices as a PACT-anticoagulation clinical pharmacy specialist at the Morehead City VA clinic. In addition to her responsibilities managing Veterans on anticoagulation, Dr. Kriger established and maintains medication management clinics at the Morehead City VA clinic with focuses on chronic disease state management including diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension.

FAQs

How do you match pharmacy residency? ›

How It Works
  1. Register for the Match. Each applicant and residency that wants to participate in the Match must register online in the NMS Match System. ...
  2. Apply to and Interview with Programs. ...
  3. Submit Your Rank Order List of Preferred Placements. ...
  4. The Matching Algorithm is Run. ...
  5. Get Your Result.

Does the VA have residency programs? ›

The PMHNP residency at VA Northern California Health Care System accepts applications for the 12-month training program starting February 1st through March 30th, interviews are conducted in early April, and the residency begins mid-August.

What should I accomplish during pharmacy residency? ›

PGY1 Goals and Curriculum
  • Care for patients in different clinical settings.
  • Educate medical, pharmacy, and allied-health personnel.
  • Function as a member of a health-care team.
  • Foster a commitment to professionalism.
  • Manage their own practice.
  • Exercise leadership in improving safety of the medication-use system.

How many beds does Durham VA hospital have? ›

Our medical center has 151 operating beds and a 100-bed, 5-star rated community living center (nursing home). The VA Durham Healthcare System has 5 national centers of excellence in primary care, mental health, epidemiology, geriatrics, and epilepsy.

What is a good GPA for pharmacy residency? ›

Depending on the residency program, some RPDs may want a minimum GPA of 3.0,4 while other programs may have a higher cut-off depending on the number of applicants for that cycle. During the first year, your focus should be on academics, particularly in the first semester.

What happens if you don't match pharmacy residency? ›

If you didn't match, you get another try. If you didn't apply or even withdrew in Phase I, you can go for it in Phase II. Phase II is very different in that you can start contacting programs right away on the list and see if they are interested in you.

How much do residents get paid in the Virginia? ›

Medical Resident Salary in Virginia
PercentileSalaryLocation
25th Percentile Medical Resident Salary$49,653VA
50th Percentile Medical Resident Salary$55,741VA
75th Percentile Medical Resident Salary$62,138VA
90th Percentile Medical Resident Salary$67,961VA
1 more row

How long does it take to become a VA resident? ›

VA lenders need to prove that you plan to use your VA loan to purchase a home as your primary residence, so you must agree to occupy the house yourself for at least 12 months.

What qualifies you as a VA resident? ›

Resident -- A person who lives in Virginia, or maintains a place of abode here, for more than 183 days during the year, or who is a legal (domiciliary) resident of the Commonwealth, is considered a Virginia resident for income tax purposes.

What percent of pharmacy students get a residency? ›

In 2020, the School had the fifth-most student pharmacists matched to residencies, and in 2021, 84 percent of the School of Pharmacy's applicants matched with residencies, compared to a national average of 67 percent.

How stressful is pharmacy residency? ›

Anyone who has survived a pharmacy residency knows that the demands, the educational workload, and issues in their personal life can cause tremendous stress. “Stress is caused by the number of things you are trying to juggle when you are a resident.

How do I ace a pharmacy residency interview? ›

  1. Arrive prepared. ...
  2. Introduce yourself well. ...
  3. Do not feel bad being nervous. ...
  4. Listen to the questions you are being asked. ...
  5. Use examples relevant to pharmacy practice. ...
  6. Be honest, but not be too honest (and definitely do not lie) ...
  7. Do not disclose confidential patient information. ...
  8. Do not bash others or be a 'hater'

What is the biggest VA hospital in the US? ›

Share this post
RankHospital Name# of Staffed Beds
1Biloxi VA Medical Center716
2Southern Oregon VA Rehabilitation Center (AKA White City VA Medical Center)600
3Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center586
4West Los Angeles VA Medical Center500
46 more rows

What is the best hospital in the state of Virginia? ›

Newsweek has ranked University of Virginia Medical Center as the No. 1 hospital in Virginia in its “World's Best Hospitals 2022” guide.

What is the biggest hospital in North Carolina? ›

The 1,048-bed Duke University Hospital, located in Durham, is the biggest hospital in North Carolina. The tertiary teaching hospital provides comprehensive diagnostic, medical and surgical services across a range of specialities. It admitted 41,274 patients and saw more than 1.3 million outpatient visits in 2021.

What is the highest paid pharmacist? ›

The highest paying pharmacists jobs are in-store pharmacist (average salary: $156,000), compounding pharmacist ($150,000), hospital pharmacist ($148,000), and pharmacometrician ($142,000).

Is a pharmacy residency worth it? ›

The average resident salary is around $45,000, well less than half of the national average pharmacist salary of $120,000. Completing a residency for one year means you are would be losing out on $75,000 and for 2 years $150,000.

How many candidates do pharmacy residency programs interview? ›

Candidates will be invited to interview in order of final ranking. A total of 5 applicants will be interviewed for each residency position offered. If a candidate turns down an interview offer, the RPD may offer that slot to the highest ranking candidate who did not get an initial interview offer.

How common is it to not match for residency? ›

Not matching once is pretty common. If you ask around, you will find that many doctors had to apply to medical school two or even three times.

Why do people fail to match in residency? ›

They include concerns about professionalism or ethics, failing a rotation or standardized test, damaging letters of recommendation, and the existence of unexplained gaps in medical school. These factors, unfortunately, may call into question a medical student's ability to successfully complete a residency program.

Do pharmacy residency programs rank all interviewees? ›

Once all interviews have been completed, the RPD will tally up the scores and candidates will be ranked according to their scores. This list will then be reviewed by the preceptors of the critical care specialty residency program and in person discussion will take place regarding the ranking order.

Why are resident salaries so low? ›

Why are doctor residents paid so little in the United States? Resident doctors are most likely paid “so little” in the United States because a large part of residency program funding falls under the auspices of Medicare and funds allocated to Medicare (for training residents) have been frozen since 1997.

Which residency pays the most? ›

What are the highest paid residencies in the US? Allergy & immunology, hematology, medical geneticists, rheumatology, and most forms of specialized surgery top the list. However, it's important to remember that these are subspecialty residencies, aka fellowships, and so are effectively PGY4+ residencies.

What is a good salary to live in Virginia? ›

As of Oct 30, 2022, the average annual pay for the Above Average jobs category in Virginia is $55,310 a year. Just in case you need a simple salary calculator, that works out to be approximately $26.59 an hour. This is the equivalent of $1,063/week or $4,609/month.

Can I be a resident of two states? ›

Legally, you can have multiple residences in multiple states, but only one domicile. You must be physically in the same state as your domicile most of the year, and able to prove the domicile is your principal residence, “true home” or “place you return to.”

Can I work at the VA as a permanent resident? ›

You must be a U.S. citizen to apply to VA for most positions, although non-citizens may be considered for Title 38 and Hybrid Title 38 health care occupations when it is not possible to recruit qualified citizens for necessary services.

How long do you have to live in VA to get a VA license? ›

The state requires new residents to get their Virginia driver's license within 60 days of moving. If you already have a valid driver's license in another state, you can easily transfer your license to Virginia at a DMV location.

What is the 183 day rule? ›

Understanding the 183-Day Rule

Generally, this means that if you spent 183 days or more in the country during a given year, you are considered a tax resident for that year. Each nation subject to the 183-day rule has its own criteria for considering someone a tax resident.

What taxes do VA residents pay? ›

Virginia Tax Rates, Collections, and Burdens

Virginia also has a 6.00 percent corporate income tax rate and permits local gross receipts taxes. Virginia has a 5.30 percent state sales tax rate, a max local sales tax rate of 0.70 percent, and an average combined state and local sales tax rate of 5.75 percent.

Do Virginia residents pay state taxes? ›

You must file an income tax return in Virginia if:

you are a resident of Virginia, part-year resident, or a nonresident, and.

How many pharmacy students match with residency? ›

There were 5,128 students and graduates from across the country competing for 3,688 postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) positions, for a national match rate of 72 percent.

Does GPA matter for pharmacy residency? ›

GPA is another factor many students worry about. Treat GPA like a minimum qualifier – it just has to be good enough. This is not a reason to slack off – an excellent GPA will only help your application – but do not think you cannot get a residency if you don't have a 4.0.

How many PGY1 positions are there? ›

The 2022 Main Residency Match included 39,205 total positions, the largest number on record. Of those, 36,277 were first-year (PGY-1) positions, also the largest on record and a 3.1 percentage point increase over last year.

What is the burnout rate for pharmacists? ›

Key Points. Burnout among hospital pharmacists is high (61%) and comparable to burnout rates among physicians and nurses.

Why are pharmacists burned out? ›

Clinical pharmacists have unique stressors that can contribute to burnout, such as working in high-stress environments with little to no margin for error. The consequences of burnout may include reduced job satisfaction and increased rates of various mental health diagnoses.

What is the most reported cause of burnout in hospital pharmacy? ›

The causes of burnout are rooted in personal and workplace concerns. Patients are relying more on pharmacists more than ever. Nearly all — 99 percent — of those surveyed in our 2021 patient survey said their relationship with their pharmacists had changed.

What should you not say in a residency interview? ›

Don't talk about your pets, hobbies, etc. Know the resident profile of what this particular residency most values- experiences, skill set and personality- and then discuss how you fit- in 30-60 seconds. Practice with a SO/ friend or calling your cell phone voice mail and listen to it.

What is a good number of residency interviews? ›

According to data from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) the median number of interviews for Matched applicants in the 2020–2021 cycle was 14, so Dr. Allen's number was right in line with that. “When a student is at less than 10 interviews, we try to encourage them to think outside the box,” Dr. Allen said.

What are the top 3 attributes you are looking for in a residency program? ›

Reputation of program—84.6%. Quality of residents in the program—76.1%. Work-life balance—75.2%.

What state has the most VA hospitals? ›

With so many vets to serve, there are about 1,293 VA health care facilities across the country, making the Veterans Health Administration the largest integrated health care system in the United States. And the state with the most VA hospitals is California.

What is the number one hospital in the whole world? ›

Rochester, Minn. -based Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and Boston-based Massachusetts General Hospital were named the top three hospitals in the world in 2022 by Newsweek. For its fourth annual ranking, the magazine, in collaboration with consumer research company Statista, ranked hospitals in 27 countries.

What is the oldest VA hospital? ›

The first National Home, now VA's oldest hospital, opened near Augusta, Maine, on November 1, 1866. They provided medical care and long-term housing for thousands of Civil War Veterans. Many programs and processes begun at the National Homes continue at VHA today.

What is the most beautiful hospital in America? ›

Bon Secours St. Francis Medical Center of Midlothian, Va., has been named America's Most Beautiful Hospital by a poll of Soliant.com visitors. Soliant Health, an Adecco Group company, is a leading provider of specialized healthcare staffing services to hospitals and healthcare providers.

What is the number 1 heart hospital in the US? ›

Cleveland Clinic is once again ranked No. 1, a position it also held in the company's rankings from 2020-2021 and 2021-2022.

What are the top 10 hospitals in Virginia? ›

  • Sentara Norfolk General Hospital. ...
  • VCU Medical Center. ...
  • Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital. ...
  • Winchester Medical Center. ...
  • Centra Lynchburg General Hospital. ...
  • Inova Fair Oaks Hospital. Fairfax, VA 22033-1798. ...
  • Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital. Charlottesville, VA 22911-4668. ...
  • Inova Alexandria Hospital. Alexandria, VA 22304-1535.

Is UNC or Duke a better hospital? ›

Duke ranked in the top spot and 22nd overall in the nation.

› virginia › best-hospitals-virginia-u-s-n... ›

Best Hospitals In Virginia: U.S. News 2020 Rankings - Arlington, VA - New rankings from U.S. News & World Report identify the best hospitals by specialty an...
1 on the 2020-21 Best Hospitals list. The teaching hospital is nationally ranked in 15 adult specialties and eight pediatric specialties, and its Department of ...
Of those, 12 are dictated mostly by data, while ophthalmology, psychiatry, rehabilitation and rheumatology are determined entirely by expert opinion, according ...

Do pharmacists get matched? ›

So what's the Match? The Match is a standardized process that pairs applicants with available residency positions after the application and evaluation process is completed on Pharmacy Online Residency Centralized Application Service (PhORCAS). Both PhORCAS and the Match are overseen by the ASHP.

What are my chances of getting a pharmacy residency? ›

The graduating class match rate to PGY1 residencies was 14.2% for all colleges and schools, 16.0% for public colleges and schools, and 12.6% for private colleges and schools. Colleges and schools with a first graduating class greater than 20 years ago matched 16.7% of students to residency programs.

What percent of pharmacy students get a residency? ›

In 2020, the School had the fifth-most student pharmacists matched to residencies, and in 2021, 84 percent of the School of Pharmacy's applicants matched with residencies, compared to a national average of 67 percent.

Do pharmacy residency programs rank all interviewees? ›

Once all interviews have been completed, the RPD will tally up the scores and candidates will be ranked according to their scores. This list will then be reviewed by the preceptors of the critical care specialty residency program and in person discussion will take place regarding the ranking order.

Why you should date a pharmacist? ›

1. Pharmacists are trained to be very aware of your health needs — this makes them extremely good listeners. 2. Your date will have the ability to make decisions and offer advice on the spot.

Are pharmacists declining? ›

The number of pharmacists employed in the United States dropped about 1 percent from 2020 to 2021.

Does a pharmacist know more than a doctor? ›

They know what's in your meds

Pharmacists have more training and knowledge than physicians on how medications are made into pills, patches, etc. and how medications are absorbed and distributed in the body, metabolized, and excreted,” says Sally Rafie, PharmD, pharmacist specialist at UC San Diego Health.

How stressful is pharmacy residency? ›

Anyone who has survived a pharmacy residency knows that the demands, the educational workload, and issues in their personal life can cause tremendous stress. “Stress is caused by the number of things you are trying to juggle when you are a resident.

How many pharmacy students match with residency? ›

There were 5,128 students and graduates from across the country competing for 3,688 postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) positions, for a national match rate of 72 percent.

How many candidates do pharmacy residency programs interview? ›

Candidates will be invited to interview in order of final ranking. A total of 5 applicants will be interviewed for each residency position offered. If a candidate turns down an interview offer, the RPD may offer that slot to the highest ranking candidate who did not get an initial interview offer.

Does GPA matter for pharmacy residency? ›

GPA is another factor many students worry about. Treat GPA like a minimum qualifier – it just has to be good enough. This is not a reason to slack off – an excellent GPA will only help your application – but do not think you cannot get a residency if you don't have a 4.0.

How many pharmacy residency spots are there? ›

The ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists) announced today 4,988 individuals matched with 2,430 pharmacy residency programs across the country in Phase I of ASHP's 2022 Pharmacy Residency Match.

How important is research for pharmacy residency? ›

Abstract. Practice-related projects and pharmacy practice research are requirements to complete postgraduate pharmacy residency programs. Many residents will complete residencies without fully developing the skills needed to perform research required for new clinical and academic positions.

Can residency programs see how you rank them? ›

Again, although a program will not know how you actually did rank them, being as honest as possible is a practice we cannot emphasize enough.

How many residency interviews Should you accept? ›

According to data from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) the median number of interviews for Matched applicants in the 2020–2021 cycle was 14, so Dr. Allen's number was right in line with that. “When a student is at less than 10 interviews, we try to encourage them to think outside the box,” Dr. Allen said.

How do I ace a pharmacy residency interview? ›

  1. Arrive prepared. ...
  2. Introduce yourself well. ...
  3. Do not feel bad being nervous. ...
  4. Listen to the questions you are being asked. ...
  5. Use examples relevant to pharmacy practice. ...
  6. Be honest, but not be too honest (and definitely do not lie) ...
  7. Do not disclose confidential patient information. ...
  8. Do not bash others or be a 'hater'

Videos

1. Replicating Innovative HIV Care Strategies in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program
(Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program TargetHIV)
2. HDSA DISABILITY CHAT - VA Benefits & Social Security
(Huntington's Disease Society of America)
3. VA of Southern Nevada gets COVID-19 vaccine
(FOX5 Las Vegas)
4. Hiding in Plain Sight: Research Opportunities for EC Researchers in Veterans Health Administration
(SAEM)
5. Teens Mock Boy At Burger King, Don’t Notice Man On Bench
(Viral Stories)
6. QC Podcast S2 EP40: Coordinating Care for Older Adults
(PQS/EQuIPP)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Manual Maggio

Last Updated: 01/03/2023

Views: 5527

Rating: 4.9 / 5 (69 voted)

Reviews: 84% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Manual Maggio

Birthday: 1998-01-20

Address: 359 Kelvin Stream, Lake Eldonview, MT 33517-1242

Phone: +577037762465

Job: Product Hospitality Supervisor

Hobby: Gardening, Web surfing, Video gaming, Amateur radio, Flag Football, Reading, Table tennis

Introduction: My name is Manual Maggio, I am a thankful, tender, adventurous, delightful, fantastic, proud, graceful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.