Outpatient Physical Therapy (2022)

Physical Therapists

Outpatient Physical Therapy (1)Oyinda Awe, PT, DPT
Education: HamptonUniversity, 2016
Clinical Interests: Pelvic floor rehabilitation (for men and women), diastasis recti, neck and back pain, TMJ dysfunction, prepartumand postpartum care, visceral manipulation, craniosacral therapy, trigger point dry needling and muscle energy technique

Outpatient Physical Therapy (2)Tracey D. Bates, MPS, MS, OTR/L, CLT, CPAM, CHT
Education: New York University, 2009
Certifications: Certified Lymphedema Therapist, Certified Hand Therapist
Clinical Interests: Breast cancer rehabilitation, head and neck cancer treatment, orthopedics, post-surgical rehabilitation (wrist and hand)

Outpatient Physical Therapy (3)Rachel Bracken, PT, DPT, AIB-VR
Education: University of New Mexico
Certifications: Board Certification in Orthopedics, AIB-VR. FSOAE
Clinical Interests: Male and female pelvic health rehabilitation, care for the pregnant and post-partum patient, orthopedics, vestibular rehabilitation, TMJ, geriatric care

Outpatient Physical Therapy (4)Mary Busch, PT, DPT
Education: The George Washington University, 2018
Certifications:LSVT BIGParkinson's Rehabilitation
Clinical Interests: Neurological rehabilitation, gait and balance training, spinal cord injury rehabilitation, post-surgical rehabilitation, orthopedic injuries

Outpatient Physical Therapy (5)Natasha Chevalier-Richards, PT, DPT
Education: Temple University, 2010
Certifications: Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Neurological Physical Therapy, LSVT BIG Parkinson’s Rehabilitation
Clinical Interests: Adult neurological rehabilitation, gait and balance training, wheelchair seating and mobility, vestibular rehabilitation, spinal cord injury rehabilitation

Outpatient Physical Therapy (6)Devin Christman, PT, DPT, OCS,FAAOMPT
Education: Widener University, 2012
Certifications: Board-Certified Orthopedic Specialist, Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists, Trigger Point Dry Needling, Graston Technique Trained, Titleist Performance Institute Certified
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic and sports conditions, manual therapy, neck and back pain

Outpatient Physical Therapy (7)Keith Cole, PPT, DPT, PHD, MBiomedE, OCS
Education: University of New South Wales, 2004 (MBiomedE); University of Iowa, 2006 (DPT); University of Iowa, 2017 (PhD)
Certifications: Orthopedic Clinical Specialist, Credentialed Clinical Instructor
Clinical Interests: Vestibular Disorders (dizziness), Post-Concussion Symptoms, Orthopedic and Sports injury, running injuries, Falls prevention and balance in older adults

Outpatient Physical Therapy (8)Hope Cunningham, DPT
Education: University of Maryland, Baltimore, 2018
Clinical Interests: Pelvic health (all genders), pelvic and genital pain, urge incontinence, stress incontinence, post-partum rehabilitation, prolapse

Outpatient Physical Therapy (9)Erin Kennedy Dalisay, PT, DPT
Education: The George Washington University, 2019
Certifications: Running Gait Analysis (Level 1 and 2), Run Coaching Certification (RRCA), LSVT BIG Parkinson’s Rehabilitation
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic and sport injuries, running rehabilitation, manual therapy, spinal pain, persistent pain

Outpatient Physical Therapy (10)Laura Danberg, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS
Education: University of Delaware, 2009
Certifications: Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Sports and in Orthopedics, Certified in Dry Needling
Clinical Interests: Sports rehabilitation, running injuries, ACL rehabilitation, dry needling

Outpatient Physical Therapy (11)Polo Lynn Edwards, PT, DPT, Cert. MDT
Education: Thomas Jefferson University 2014
Certifications: MDT, Blood Flow Restriction
Clinical Interests: Spine, Shoulder, Overhead athlete, Sports Medicine

Outpatient Physical Therapy (12)DanielFinn, PT, MBA
Education: University of Scranton, 1996
Certifications: Board Certified Orthopedic Specialist, Oncology Rehabilitation, Trigger Point Dry Needling, APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor
Clinical Interests: Musculoskeletal and orthopedic physical therapy with special interest in spinal pain and shoulder pain

Outpatient Physical Therapy (13)Rachel (Fox) Payne, PT, DPT
Education: University of Miami, 2013
Certifications:Comprehensive Polestar Pilates Practitioner, Certified Manual Trigger Point Therapist (Dry Needling), Selective Functional Movement Assessment Certified
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic injuries, sports medicine, performance and dance rehabilitation, endurance athletes, post-surgical rehabilitation, persistent pain conditions

Outpatient Physical Therapy (14)Joanna Hsu, PT, DPT
Education: The George Washington University, 2021
Clinical Interests: Neurological rehabilitation, gait and balance training, vestibular rehabilitation, concussion rehabilitation, wheelchair seating and mobility

Outpatient Physical Therapy (15)Sophia (Fieke) Janson,PT, GCS
Education: Medical College of Virginia-Virginia Commonwealth University, 1989
Certifications: Board Certified in Geriatric Physical Therapy, LSVT BIG Parkinson's Rehabilitation
Adjunct Faculty: Marymount University
Clinical Interests: Neurological rehabilitation, amputee rehabilitation, arthritis rehabilitation, management of medically-complex clients

Outpatient Physical Therapy (16)Dhinu Jayaseelan, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT
Education: University of Illinois at Chicago, Fellowship, 2014; The George Washington University, DPT, 2010
Certifications: APTA Credentialed Advanced Clinical Instructor, Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopedics, Fellow, American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists
Clinical Interests: Manual therapy, pain science, research, tendinopathy

Outpatient Physical Therapy (17)Marie Jeffsell, PT
Education: Lund University, Sweden, 1994
Certifications: Postgraduate Certificate of Orthopedic Manual Therapy, Curtin University, Australia, 2007
Clinical Interests: Pelvic floor rehabilitation, low back and pelvic girdle pain

Outpatient Physical Therapy (18)Rhonda A. Jones, PT, MA, DPT
Education: BSPT Howard University, Master of Arts University of Maryland, DPT University of Montana, Missoula
Clinical Interests: General practice, clinical focus orthopedics, chronic pain management,integrative health and wellness

Outpatient Physical Therapy (19)Stephanie Katz, OTR/L
Education: New York University, 2019
Certifications: LSVT BIG
Clinical Interests: Upper extremity acute and chronic orthopedic injuries including post-surgical rehabilitation of the elbow, wrist and hand, osteoarthritis, nerve compression (carpal tunnel, cubital tunnel), scleroderma, DeQuervain’s, trigger finger and Dupuytrens as well as upper and lower extremity amputations

Outpatient Physical Therapy (20)Kevin Keating, PT, DPT
Education: The George Washington University, 2018
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation, hip and knee pain, sports rehabilitation

Outpatient Physical Therapy (21)Rebecca Krysiak, MS, OTR/L, CBIS
Education: Thomas Jefferson University, 2017
Certifications: LSVT BIG, Certified Brain Injury Therapist
Clinical Interests: Neurological Rehabilitation, acute and chronic orthopedic upper extremity conditions, vision impairments and low vision

Outpatient Physical Therapy (22)Beth (Elizabeth) Ljung, PT, DPT
Education: University of Maryland School of Maryland Department of Physical Therapy, 2007
Certifications: LSVT BIG, SFMA I & II
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic injuries, manual therapy, neurological rehabilitation, acquired and traumatic brain injury rehabilitation, amputee rehabilitation, spinal cord injury rehabilitation

Outpatient Physical Therapy (23)Steven Malachowski, PT, DPT, CSCS
Education: TheGeorge Washington University, 2020
Certifications: Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Running Rehab Specialist Certified
Clinical Interests: Orthopedics, Vestibular, Post-Concussion, Sports and Performance Artist Medicine, Aquatics

Outpatient Physical Therapy (24)Michele McLellan, PT, OCS, CCI
Education: Northeastern University, 1983. Residency program: The Institute for Orthopedic Manual Medicine, 1993
Certifications: Vodder Certified Lymphedema Therapist, APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor, Kinesiology Taping Practitioner Certification, Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization Certification
Adjunct Faculty:The George Washington University
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic injuries, post-surgical conditions, cancer recovery, lymphedema management. Special interests include manual therapy to treat TMJ, spine, shoulder, hip, knee, foot and ankle pain, and functional limitations.

Outpatient Physical Therapy (25)Shilamit, Mikhaylov, PT, DPT
Education: Columbia University, 2021
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic injuries, sports and dance rehabilitation, post-surgical rehabilitation, neck and back pain

Outpatient Physical Therapy (26)Lori Miller, PT, Dip. MDT
Education: Kansas University Medical Center, 2003
Certifications: DiplomatMechanical Diagnosis and Therapy/McKenzie Method
Clinical Interests: Back and neck pain, mechanical diagnosis and therapy (McKenzie Method), orthopedicinjuries

Outpatient Physical Therapy (27)Nick Moats, PT, MSPT, OCS
Education: West Virginia University, 2007
Certifications: Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopedics
Clinical Interests:Hip injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation after hip labral repair/reconstruction, sports injuries, dry needling

Outpatient Physical Therapy (28)Ann G. Nicholson PT, DPT, MSc, OCS, MTC
Education: University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, 2007; University College London, 2017
Certifications: Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist (OCS), Manual Therapy Certified (MTC), level 1 dry needling certified
Clinical Interests: Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Manual Therapy, Dry Needling, Functional Training

Outpatient Physical Therapy (29)Dorie Prince PT, DPT
Education: Quinnipiac University, 2011
Clinical Interests: Gait and balance training, neurological rehabilitation, wheelchair seating and mobility assessments

Outpatient Physical Therapy (30)Lambert Quartey, LPT
Education: University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy, 1995
Clinical Interests: Sports Medicine, lumbosacral, manual therapy, dry needling, knee and ankle injuries

Outpatient Physical Therapy (31)Kristen Quinn, PT, DPT
Education: University of Maryland Eastern Shore, 2011
Certifications: Board Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist, Certified Brain Injury Specialist, APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor, Functional Dry Needling, STAR Program–Oncology Rehabilitation, CITI Training,LSVT BIG Parkinson's Rehabilitation
Clinical Interests: Neurological rehabilitation, post-traumatic rehabilitation, evidence-based practice, management of chronic illness with focus on quality of life

Outpatient Physical Therapy (32)Neelima Reddy, PT
Education: Youngstown State University, 2003
Credential: APTA Credentialed CIinical Instructor
Clinical Interests: Orthopedic injuries, post surgical rehabilitation, vestibular rehabilitation, post concussion

Outpatient Physical Therapy (33)Brian Salazar, PT, DPT
Education: TheGeorge Washington University, 2020
Clinical Interests: Post-op total hip/knee arthroplasty, orthopedic injuries, sports conditions, low back pain, hip/knee pain,shoulder pain

Outpatient Physical Therapy (34)Jose Sanfeliz, PT, DPT
Education: Old Dominion University, 2019
Clinical Interests: General orthopedics, post-surgical rehabilitation, Long COVID rehabilitation

Outpatient Physical Therapy (35)Pamela Shields, PT, DPT, OCS, Dip MDT, CEASI
Education: Temple University,2004
Certifications: Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopedics, Diplomat Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (McKenzie Method), Certified Ergonomics Assessment Specialist
Clinical Interests:Musculoskeletal injuries and disorders of the spine and extremities

Outpatient Physical Therapy (36)Joseph Signorino, PT, DPT
Education: MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, 2010
Advanced Training: Fellow, American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists
Certifications: Board Certified Orthopedic Specialist, Trigger Point Dry Needling, APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor
Clinical Interests: Musculoskeletal and orthopedic conditions addressed with manual physical therapy and exercise; special interest in conservative management for chronic conditions

Outpatient Physical Therapy (37)Michael L. Taber, PT, DPT
Education: The George Washington University, 2017
Certifications: Emory University Certificate in Vestibular Rehabilitation,APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor, Cert. DN
Clinical Interests:Post-COVID rehab, orthopedic injuries, post-surgical rehabilitation, vestibular rehabilitation, concussion, general wellness

Outpatient Physical Therapy (38)Carla Vertudes, PT
Education: Far Eastern University, Philippines, 2005
Certifications: American Physical Therapy Association Credentialed Clinical Instructor
Clinical Interests: Pelvic floor rehabilitation, incontinence, pelvic pain, vaginismus, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/primary lateral sclerosis

Outpatient Physical Therapy (39)Karen Whitesell, PT, DPT, NCS, ATP
Education: A.T. Still University, 2015; University of Maryland University College, 1994; Medical College of Virginia-Virginia Commonwealth University, 1981
Certifications: Board Certified in Neurologic Physical Therapy, Certified in Assistive Technology by the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, LSVT BIGParkinson’s Rehabilitation
Clinical Interests: Adult neurological rehabilitation, spinal cord injury rehab, wheelchair seating and mobility, limb preservation/amputee rehabilitation

Outpatient Physical Therapy (40)Jamie Wigton, PT, DPT, CLT
Education:Drexel University, 2013
Certifications:Certified Lymphedema Therapist, APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor
Clinical Interests:Cancer survivorship rehabilitation, complete decongestive therapy for lymphedema management

FAQs

When should I stop physical therapy? ›

In general, you should attend physical therapy until you reach your PT goals or until your therapist—and you—decide that your condition is severe enough that your goals need to be re-evaluated. Typically, it takes about 6 to 8 weeks for soft tissue to heal, so your course of PT may last about that long.

Does physical therapy help arthritis? ›

Physical therapy (PT) is a promising treatment option for arthritis. Working with a physical therapist can help you manage symptoms, increase mobility, and improve physical function. They'll also teach you specific exercises and techniques that can allow you to move with less pain and greater ease.

Can physical therapy cause more pain? ›

While many patients perceive physical therapy as a process that increases pain (with physical therapists sometimes referred to jokingly as “torturing” patients), the reality is that physical therapy's purpose is to reduce pain, not increase it.

What are your weaknesses as a physical therapist? ›

When it comes to weaknesses, you can say that you are sometimes over sympathetic, and struggle to forget your job in your personal life. Alternatively you can pick a weakness that does not matter for physios–poor team management skills, lack of computer skills, etc.

Can physical therapy do more harm than good? ›

Much of what goes on in those visits — especially exercise and hands-on therapy — can help by boosting strength, restoring flexibility and stabilizing joints. But some techniques aren't backed by sound science and can even do more harm than good.

Is physical therapy once a week enough? ›

A typical order for physical therapy will ask for 2-3 visits per week for 4-6 weeks. Sometimes the order will specify something different. What generally happens is for the first 2-3 weeks, we recommend 3x per week.

How long does physical therapy last for osteoarthritis? ›

Physical therapy appointments are typically scheduled 1 to 3 times a week and for a few weeks or longer. After that, individuals can maintain their physical therapy programs on their own at home.

Can you overdo physical therapy? ›

While your recovery is heavily influenced by your strength and mobility, it is still possible to overdo it if you aren't careful. Your physical therapist will talk to you about ways to balance physical therapy exercises and activities with proper amounts of rest.

What is the best exercise for someone with arthritis? ›

Walking, biking, swimming, tai chi, yoga, and water aerobics are all good aerobic exercises for people with osteoarthritis. Water exercise is especially ideal because of water's soothing warmth and buoyancy. It's a gentle way to exercise joints and muscles -- plus it acts as resistance to help build muscle strength.

How do I know if physical therapy is working? ›

If you faithfully complete your exercise homework and your range of motion has not changed after a few appointments, it's time for a discussion with your physical therapist. If you do not progress, it may be time for a second opinion. You don't see a progression in your treatment plan.

How long does it take for physical therapy to start working? ›

Muscle can take up to two to four weeks. Tendon can take up to four to six weeks. Bone can take up to six to eight weeks. Ligaments can take up to ten to twelve weeks.

Should I take a day off from physical therapy? ›

Just remember that rest is an extremely important part of the healing process. Taking part in rehab exercises is key to gaining strength and mobility back in the injured area. With that being said, there must be rest days in between; without it there will be no progress.

How do you answer tell me about yourself? ›

Your answer to the "tell me about yourself" question should describe your current situation, your past job experience, the reason you're a good fit for the role, and how you align with the company values. Tell the interviewer about your current position and a recent big accomplishment or positive feedback you received.

What are my strengths as a physical therapist? ›

12 Qualities of a Physical Therapist That Lead to Success
  • Be Realistic. Some conditions, such as chronic musculoskeletal disorders, are challenging to treat. ...
  • Be Patient. ...
  • Be Collaborative. ...
  • Be Determined. ...
  • Be Resilient. ...
  • Be Compassionate. ...
  • Be Knowledgeable. ...
  • Have Integrity.

What makes a good physical therapist assistant? ›

Ability to lift patients and help them move. Ability to read and execute detailed instructions. Good interpersonal skills. Excellent verbal and written communication.

Can physical therapy make a condition worse? ›

Physical therapy is a common and legitimate treatment option for many different conditions, injuries, as well as surgery recovery. Physical therapy is aimed at improving symptoms and pain, but sometimes patients experience worsening symptoms after engaging in physical therapy exercises.

Why do I feel worse after physical therapy? ›

While it's not uncommon to feel sore after physical therapy, you should never experience severe pain. It's important not to confuse soreness with pain. Muscles that have become tight and weak over time require stretching and exercise which results in a lactic acid build-up that can cause irritation.

Does physical therapy actually help lower back pain? ›

When you're suffering from back or neck pain, it may be tempting to stay on the couch all day. But that's a prescription for more pain. Although getting up and moving might be the last thing you feel like doing, physical therapy and exercise can be the best way to reduce pain.

What time of day is best for physical therapy? ›

The Right Time to Exercise
  • the risk of injury is lowest and physical performance peaks between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.
  • muscles are strongest between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m.
  • lung function is most efficient in the late afternoon.
  • joints and muscles are most flexible in the early evening.

How often does a PT need to see a patient? ›

After about six to eight weeks of consistent treatments and seeing progress, your PT will likely recommend that the frequency be lessened to one visit a week. This encourages the independent management of your condition and promotes the habit of at-home exercises.

Should you rest after physical therapy? ›

Utilize the rest days between therapy sessions to restore your energy and strength. Make sure to get good sleep, deep relaxation, and enjoyment during recovery. Getting sufficient rest leads to a healthy mind and body. You'll also increase your chances of early recovery if you set aside enough time for rest and sleep.

How effective is physical therapy for osteoarthritis? ›

Results: Both physical therapy treatment allocations resulted in significant improvements in pain, physical function, and health related quality of life above the control group (standardized response mean 0.36 to 0.65).

Does physical therapy help severe osteoarthritis? ›

Physical therapist treatment has proven to be an effective treatment for OA, and may help you avoid surgery and use of prescription painkillers.

Can an arthritic knee get better? ›

There is no cure for arthritis of the knee. It's a lifelong condition. But the good news is treatment can relieve some of the symptoms. Treatment might even slow down or stop the disease from getting worse.

Is walking good physical therapy? ›

Walking 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week has been shown to improve cardiovascular endurance, and reduce blood pressure and weight. Lots of people are using activity trackers and apps to track steps during their daily activities, and this too has been shown to have benefits.

Can PT make sciatica worse? ›

Certain exercises can exacerbate sciatica symptoms, especially if they strain or put pressure on your back, core, and legs. While it's important to increase strength and flexibility in these areas, you need to do it slowly and safely.

Is it normal to be tired after physical therapy? ›

After physical therapy, if you are tired, it is a sign that your muscles and body are exhausted, but in a good way. It's close to how preparation works for strength.

What painkiller is best for arthritis? ›

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

NSAIDs are the most effective oral medicines for OA. They include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) naproxen (Aleve) and diclofenac (Voltaren, others). All work by blocking enzymes that cause pain and swelling.

What activities make arthritis worse? ›

Here are 4 things to avoid doing if you have arthritis:
  • Not exercising. It seems logical that if your joints hurt it would be better not to exercise because it would make things worse. ...
  • Exercising too much. Forget the thinking that if a little is good, a lot is better. ...
  • Ignoring your weight. ...
  • Not using mobility aids.
4 May 2022

What should you not do with osteoarthritis? ›

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in the United States.
...
5 Foods to Avoid
  • Red meat and fried foods. Fried foods and red meat contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are known for stimulating inflammation. ...
  • Sugars. ...
  • Dairy. ...
  • Refined carbohydrates. ...
  • Alcohol and tobacco.
21 Dec 2020

Can Physical therapists diagnose problems? ›

In most states, physical therapists cannot make a medical diagnosis. This is something that your physician will provide for you. While physical therapists are important members of your medical team, physicians are typically the healthcare providers that will provide you with a medical diagnosis.

Does physical therapy hurt before it gets better? ›

Physical therapy is only painful if you don't put in the time for your body to rehabilitate and heal. Our bodies have this amazing capability to heal itself. They say those patients who are the most involved in their own care, are more likely to experience a successful outcome.

What do you say to a physical therapist? ›

What Should I Tell My Physical Therapist?
  • Talk about the pain you are experiencing. ...
  • How did your injury happen and/or when did your pain begin? ...
  • What are your recovery goals? ...
  • Give your physical therapist you primary care provider's information. ...
  • Tell your physical therapist about any medications you are currently taking.
7 Jun 2016

What is the success rate of physical therapy? ›

Results: Page 2 2 At 7 weeks, the success rates were 68.3% for manual therapy, 50.8% for physical therapy, and 35.9% for continued [physician] care. Statistically significant differences in pain intensity with manual therapy compared with continued care or physical therapy ranged from 0.9 to 1.5 on a scale of 0 to 10.

What should I do after physical therapy session? ›

Helping Your Body Recover After Physical Therapy
  • Hydrate – Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated after a workout. ...
  • Stretch – Your body will likely experience some soreness as muscles are tested like they haven't been in the past.
6 Dec 2021

How long does physical therapy take for lower back pain? ›

But on average, patients can expect to be in physical therapy for six to eight weeks as strength and mobility progress with every session. If your back pain continues to be severe or even worse, physical therapy may take longer or may be recommended after surgical intervention.

Can you do PT 2 days in a row? ›

But for the average person, aim to train the same muscle group no more than twice a week, leaving at least 48 hours between each, recommends Pire. So, no, you probably shouldn't strength train the same muscle group two days in a row.

How much does a physical therapy session cost? ›

The national average per session cost of physical therapy can range from $30 - $400. However, with a qualified insurance plan, once your deductible is met, your total out-of-pocket cost typically ranges from $20-$60. If you do not have insurance, you may be paying between $50-$155 out-of-pocket.

Can I do PT twice a day? ›

Two-a-day rule: In the military, you cannot control what workouts you do with your command PT group. However, you can control the second workout of the day. Make sure you work the same muscle group in the afternoon as you did in morning with the PT group.

What should you not say in an interview? ›

Photos courtesy of the individual members.
  • Speak Negatively About Yourself.
  • Criticize Your Previous Employer.
  • Act As If You're Not Excited.
  • Be The First To Bring Up Compensation.
  • Ask For Feedback At The End.
  • Discuss Personal Things.
  • Ask Why The Position Is Vacant.
  • Admit You Didn't Do Your Research.
30 Mar 2021

What is your weakness best answer? ›

Answer “what is your greatest weakness” by choosing a skill that is not essential to the job you're applying to and by stressing exactly how you're practically addressing your weakness. Some skills that you can use as weaknesses include impatience, multitasking, self-criticism, and procrastination.

What are your weaknesses as a physical therapist? ›

When it comes to weaknesses, you can say that you are sometimes over sympathetic, and struggle to forget your job in your personal life. Alternatively you can pick a weakness that does not matter for physios–poor team management skills, lack of computer skills, etc.

What is unique about physical therapy? ›

Based on their distinctive knowledge and training, physical therapists provide a unique perspective on purposeful, precise, and efficient movement across the lifespan and use movement-related interventions to optimize functional capacity and performance.

How do you answer tell me about yourself in DPT interview? ›

Tell Me about Yourself DOs and DONTs for the PT School Interview

Is PTA a stressful job? ›

Being a physical therapist assistant is emotionally demanding sometimes. Many patients are in pain and facing uncertainty about their health. Some may even be short-tempered.

Do you have to be good at math to be a physical therapist assistant? ›

No science-based career would be complete without a solid foundation in mathematics. Most physical therapy programs require completion of geometry, algebra and pre-calculus. Therefore, you will need to take these courses in high school to prepare for college requirements.

How do you address a physical therapist? ›

Examples of proper usage in written communication would be: Dr. Jane Smith, Doctor of Physical Therapy. Jane Smith, DPT.

Should physical therapy be done everyday? ›

Your body needs time to rest and heal, and going through your exercises every day doesn't provide the break your body needs. On the other hand, if you have a few different exercises, your provider may allow you to split them up and do them on alternating days.

Can you overdo physical therapy? ›

While your recovery is heavily influenced by your strength and mobility, it is still possible to overdo it if you aren't careful. Your physical therapist will talk to you about ways to balance physical therapy exercises and activities with proper amounts of rest.

How do I know if physical therapy is working? ›

If you faithfully complete your exercise homework and your range of motion has not changed after a few appointments, it's time for a discussion with your physical therapist. If you do not progress, it may be time for a second opinion. You don't see a progression in your treatment plan.

How long does it take physical therapy to work? ›

A good physical therapist will track progress and check whether you are making gains in range of motion, function, and strength. Generally, soft tissues will take between six and eight weeks to heal, meaning that a typical physiotherapy program will last about that long.

When physical therapy is too much? ›

Signs your physical rehab program may be overdoing it include: Muscle failure while trying to tone and strengthen your body. Muscle soreness two days after a workout or rehab session. Excessive or “therapeutic” bruising from a deep tissue massage.

How often does a PT need to see a patient? ›

After about six to eight weeks of consistent treatments and seeing progress, your PT will likely recommend that the frequency be lessened to one visit a week. This encourages the independent management of your condition and promotes the habit of at-home exercises.

Can you do PT 2 days in a row? ›

But for the average person, aim to train the same muscle group no more than twice a week, leaving at least 48 hours between each, recommends Pire. So, no, you probably shouldn't strength train the same muscle group two days in a row.

Is walking good physical therapy? ›

Walking 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week has been shown to improve cardiovascular endurance, and reduce blood pressure and weight. Lots of people are using activity trackers and apps to track steps during their daily activities, and this too has been shown to have benefits.

Should you take a break from physical therapy? ›

Rest During Physical Therapy

They will also ensure that you experience no pain during the session. Getting enough rest is vital to recovering quickly from any illness or injury. Physical therapists may recommend breaks if they observe that an exercise is too much for you.

Can PT make sciatica worse? ›

Certain exercises can exacerbate sciatica symptoms, especially if they strain or put pressure on your back, core, and legs. While it's important to increase strength and flexibility in these areas, you need to do it slowly and safely.

Can Physical therapists diagnose problems? ›

In most states, physical therapists cannot make a medical diagnosis. This is something that your physician will provide for you. While physical therapists are important members of your medical team, physicians are typically the healthcare providers that will provide you with a medical diagnosis.

Does physical therapy hurt before it gets better? ›

Physical therapy is only painful if you don't put in the time for your body to rehabilitate and heal. Our bodies have this amazing capability to heal itself. They say those patients who are the most involved in their own care, are more likely to experience a successful outcome.

What do you say to a physical therapist? ›

What Should I Tell My Physical Therapist?
  • Talk about the pain you are experiencing. ...
  • How did your injury happen and/or when did your pain begin? ...
  • What are your recovery goals? ...
  • Give your physical therapist you primary care provider's information. ...
  • Tell your physical therapist about any medications you are currently taking.
7 Jun 2016

How long does physical therapy take for lower back pain? ›

But on average, patients can expect to be in physical therapy for six to eight weeks as strength and mobility progress with every session. If your back pain continues to be severe or even worse, physical therapy may take longer or may be recommended after surgical intervention.

Is it normal to be tired after physical therapy? ›

After physical therapy, if you are tired, it is a sign that your muscles and body are exhausted, but in a good way. It's close to how preparation works for strength.

How long is normal physical therapy? ›

In the outpatient physical therapy setting, your session of physical therapy will generally last from 30-60 minutes, but longer is not always better. The quality and intensity of your physical therapy session can also vary.

Outpatient physical therapy involves therapeutic exercises, manual treatment, and other physical methods to improve strength, range of motion, and pain.

Outpatient physical therapy is physical therapy completed outside the home, which requires you traveling to and from a facility for your sessions.. Outpatient physical therapy is what most people refer to or think of when they talk about physical therapy .. Outpatient physical therapy can be carried out in hospitals, private practice physical therapy clinics, doctors’ offices, and rehabilitation facilities to help treat a variety of different muscle, joint, and movement disorders.. Outpatient physical therapy almost always entails performing therapeutic exercises that help strengthen weak muscles and stretch muscles that are too tight to restore balance, improve posture, increase functional strength and range of motion , and decrease pain.. Once completed, a physical therapist will direct you to a treatment table, which can be either in a private treatment room or out in a shared gym space with other tables, equipment, physical therapists, and patients.. Depending on why you are seeking physical therapy services, your physical therapist may also have you perform balance tests or conduct special tests on parts of your body to help determine what area, such as tendons, ligaments, and cartilage , is specifically affected.. Therapeutic exercises for stretching and strengthening muscles Manual therapy, such as stretching, soft tissue mobilization and deep tissue massage, and joint mobilization and manipulation, where physical therapists may use metal tools to assist in loosening tight muscles or breaking down scar tissue, cupping to decrease muscle tightness, and kinesiotaping to assist with muscle activation as part of their manual techniques Balance training to improve your static and dynamic balance Gait training to improve your ability to walk, including proper instruction for use of assistive devices such as crutches, canes, and walkers Endurance training with cardiovascular equipment like treadmills, stationary bicycles, and ellipticals Thermal therapy with the use of moist heat or cold packs to reduce pain, stiffness, and inflammation Modalities such as electrical stimulation to help ease pain. Outpatient physical therapy can be used to treat a variety of different orthopedic conditions that affect the muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, and joints of the body.. For patients who have significant physical limitations and require physical assistance to get in and out of a chair, maintain their balance in standing, or walk, homecare services may be more appropriate to work on gaining strength first before attending outpatient physical therapy.. Inpatient physical therapy is provided to patients who are staying overnight in a healthcare facility, such as a hospital or rehabilitation facility, while outpatient physical therapy is provided at a facility that patients travel to and from.. With outpatient physical therapy, you will arrive at a facility, receive your session of physical therapy, and then return home.. Outpatient physical therapy can be provided in different facilities, including private practice physical therapy offices, physicians’ offices, multidisciplinary healthcare facilities that include other disciplines like chiropractic care, acupuncture, and massage, rehabilitation facilities, and hospitals.. Conditions that can benefit from outpatient physical therapy primarily include orthopedic injuries and surgeries that affect your muscles and joints, as well as generalized deconditioning and muscle weakness that result from a variety of different causes and affect your daily functioning.. Muscle and joint pain is often the driving factor that brings patients into outpatient physical therapy.

Senior Care: A complete guide to in-home physical therapy vs. outpatient physical therapy to understand the difference and make the right choice for you or your loved one.

Home health physical therapy is a form of PT which the professional physical therapist delivers at your home.. Home health care physical therapy offers a convenient, effective, and affordable option to get a similar level of patient care that you receive in a skilled PT or nursing facility.. A home care physical therapist delivers the PT services as described in the patient’s treatment plan in home settings.. Home health physical therapy offers an alternative to conventional outpatient physical therapy.. Alternatively, inpatient physical therapy refers to the physical therapy services that physical therapist provides during the hospital stay or at the physical therapy clinic or nursing facility.. Physical therapy for neurological, musculoskeletal, injuries and other health conditions Occupational therapy Speech therapy Psychological therapy. A physical therapist provides the in-home PT in your home, allowing your therapist to evaluate home safety, provide a checklist of required changes, recommendations and deliver a personalized PT plan.. At Elite Care at Home, we have a qualified and experienced team of physical therapists who conduct in-depth home evaluations and develop an individualized PT plan to meet your specific needs.. In-home physical therapy provides more personalized care based on a one-on-one relationship with the physical therapist in a familiar and comfortable environment.. Generally, if you have a condition that resulted in functional mobility loss or a senior who cannot access an outpatient physical therapy facility, you can benefit from in-home physical therapy.. Elite Care at Home provides premium quality home physical therapy services by qualified and experienced professionals.. Our home care physical therapists understand your needs, condition, and goals while assessing your home environment to improve your condition and restore your functional mobility.

Our team offers a wide array of advanced outpatient physical therapy and rehabilitation treatments for both complex and common conditions. Learn more about our options and see a specialist today.

At your first appointment, our therapy professionals will assess your current condition and your desired level of function.. You can expect them to ask questions about your pain or limitations, including how your condition is affecting your life.. Please be prepared to share information about your medical history, including any medications you're taking.. During this evaluation, you may also be tested on your range of motion, strength, mobility, balance, and coordination.. We recommend wearing loose, comfortable clothing and supportive footwear at every visit.. Then, your therapists will work as a team to determine the best plan of action to address the root cause of your challenges, taking into consideration your unique needs and goals.. Your treatment plan may involve therapeutic exercises aimed to address physical, cognitive, or emotional challenges.. Each individual's therapy plan varies, and your therapists will recommend that you return for therapy at regular intervals.. Some patients may need only a few therapy sessions while others may need physical therapy for a longer period of time.

Physical therapy costs $20 to $150 per session on average which lasts about an hour. Rates are $20 to $55 with insurance and $75 to $150 without insurance.

The average cost of physical therapy can range from $20 to $350 per session with most paying $30 with insurance , and $125 per session without insurance .. Physical Therapy Cost National Average Cost. $75. Minimum Cost. $20. Maximum Cost. $350. Average Range $50. to. $125 When suffering from a recent injury, chronic pain, or limited mobility, a physical therapist can help you manage your pain through science-based exercises called PT sessions.. Health insurance companies cover 50 to 75 percent of the costs when medically necessary.. The average physical therapy cost for knee injuries is around $100 per session when paying out-of-pocket.. If your insurance doesn't cover physical therapy, the cost of private pay physical therapy can be 30 to 50 percent less when you pay in cash.

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